Hello everyone, sorry I haven’t been posting much, been out of country for work and just getting caught up since returning. Before starting I’d like to thank all of you that have been registering on this site, with all the uncertainty around YouTube’s policies on shooting and hunting, I want to have another way to reach out to you all with content. So, the last hunt I went on before heading abroad was another trip down to Texas. I took the AirForce Texan .357 on a hog hunt outside of Abilene, on a smallish property of a couple hundred acres a few miles outside city limits. This is a wide open property that connects some much larger farms, and gets a fair bit of hog traffic. I arrived at the blind situated over a feeder, on the back forty of this farm property where I’ve seen pigs, but never had the opportunity to shoot. The landowner, a friend named Shawn McDonald, asked me if I could throw a couple bags of corn in one of the feeders when I got out to the property. Seems it had malfunctioned in heavy winds and dumped all the corn in one go, and some other guys had seen that it was empty but not had a chance to refill it. I was going to fill it, then make my way to another blind further back, but it had been raining and I was in a rental 2 wheel drive SUV that I didn’tRead More →

Last month I was out in Texas and took the Air Venturi Seneca Aspen out for a few rabbit hunts. The rifle is a multi-pump PCP platform: the air reservoir takes an initial fill from either an external air source (like any PCP), or can be pumped up from empty using the integrated pump. The difference between this mechanism and a traditional mulit-pump designs such as the Benjamin and Sheridan rifles, is that once filled (250 BAR), the gun can shoot 10-15 pellets before it needs to be pumped. In this respect it is like a standard PCP ……. except the pump is built in which makes this a self contained powerplant. This freedom from an external air source has always been the advantage of the spring piston air rifle, and the Aspen could be a good fit for airgunners that have stayed away from PCP’s because of costs and the amount of gear required. You might have to spend several hundred dollars for the PCP rifle, then several hundred more for fill gear which ramped up the initial investment. Will the Aspen the cost is under $400.00, and you don’t need anything else. I have a comprehensive collection of tanks and compressors, but still like the idea of having a rifle that can always be ready to shoot packed in my camping rig or kayak. The Aspen is inherently accurate, and importantly, easy to shoot accurately. There are two power settings, though I confess I haven’t worked with theRead More →