I recently posted about the importance of practicing different real world shooting positions when heading into the field to hunt. In this post I’m going to discuss getting a gun ready for a hunt. I’d received the Hatsan Hercules and was going to take it with me on a hunt down in Texas, to use as my pig gun. My first activity was to take the rifle to my indoor range and zero it at 20 yards, just to get a feel for it with the JSB .35 cal pellets I intended to feed it. I was happy with the way it grouped on paper at close range, so after mapping a shot string across the chrony to assess the power profile, I took it a friends farm for some field shooting After setting the zero at 50 yards, I was ready to get started. I spent a morning shooting the Herc offhand and off sticks, and also shifted between sitting, kneeling, and standing positions. I knew there wasn’t much chance of a prone shot, so didn’t spend much time on my belly. I figured that I wouldn’t take more than five shots on an outing, so didn’t really worry about dialing in the POI throughout an entire shot string, and topped off after the 5th shot. After putting a tin of pellets through the rifle, I felt pretty comfortable with this Hatsan and was ready to go! When I arrived on-site, I quickly checked zero (set at 50 yards),Read More →

Airgun Hunting: Pigs and Pigeons with a .22 Air Rifle I had the opportunity to take the Brocock Bantam PCP air rifle out on a break from big game hunting, to do some pest control work on pigeons, and turn what I’d originally intended as a predator hunt into a pig hunt. This rifle is the “bottle-in-the-front” flavor of the Compatto, which was the first joint development of the engineering groups at Daystate and Brocock. This semi-bullpup has the refinement of a Daystate along with the compact design that characterizes the Brocock rifles. First up is the hog hunt, I was set up over a water hole in a natural hide behind some fallen logs. I scattered some corn (always carry a bag in my pack when hunting out here) on the road about 35-50 yards in front of me. A sounder of pigs, mostly smaller ones, came trotting in and almost by me, until a few of them scented the corn and moved into noisily feed. You can hear them smacking away in the background. They were constantly moving, but when one broke away and settled in to eat, I had a clean shot. The pellet was dropped right down the hogs ear as he stood somewhere between a broadside and quartering position. On the pellet hitting, the pig simply rolled over with a twitch. Next up, I revisited the feedlot where I’d been just a few days before, knowing there was a never-ending supply of pest birds available.Read More →